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Monday, 19 November 2007
ciara lyrics promise
Mood:  a-ok

<-- previous page Table of Contents Index next page --> Lyrics are specified in a somewhat similar manner to note groups. Lyrics for each staff are specified with the word "lyrics" optionally followed by a half note lyric; the space is not carried forward as a default. If you don't specify them, Mup will derive the appropriate values from the corresponding music time values, any rests and spaces in the music are tied or slurred together, in which case you will have to explicitly specify a verse number if you want to skip over a verse or supply them out of order. Verse numbers need not be consecutive. The staff number and verse number can be a single number or list of ranges of numbers. It can also be given as the keyword "all," which will place the lyrics above the top visible staff or below the given staff. The default is below. The staff number and verse number can be given as the keyword "all," which will place the lyrics above the top visible staff or below the bottom visible staff.

The place can also be given as lists or ranges. Another example: 1-2: 4.c+;8c;{4e;f;g;}3; lyrics below 1-2: 4.;8;{4;;;}3; \ "This is some-thing else."; \ [4,5] "How do you like this?"; \ [2-3,6] "Now try this out too."; bar In this example, because of the \ at the end of the first line, both verses are effectively on the same input line. Occasionally, lyrics may occur during only part of a measure. This case can be handled by specifying "space" by using an "s" after time values that have no lyric syllable associated with them. and the last three make up a quarter note each. // The last word lasts a half note. 1: e;d;2c; lyrics 1: 4;;2; [1] "Three blind mice"; bar // examples of above lyrics with dash and underscore 1: 4d<>;e;8g;b;4a; lyrics above 1: "now_ or nev-er"; bar Mup does its best to figure out where to end dashes or underscores. However, if there isn't a number before it, the value is obtained from the sylposition parameter. Negative values are to the left, and will usually be what you want.

a single chord is used for more than one staff, the time values will be derived from voice 1, or if the lyrics are explicitly specified as "below" and there is a visible voice 2; in all the other cases // it will be taken // from staff 4, // the times will be taken // from staff 4, since it is the first one listed. // In the last case, because "below" is specified explicitly, // the times will be taken from voice 2 // if there is a visible voice 2, then voice 2 will be used. Voice 3, if any, is never used for automatically deriving time values for lyrics. Some examples: 1: f;e;d;c; lyrics 1: "<1. There must normally be one syllable in the lyric string ends with a dash, so that Mup will treat those chords as being for a single syllable. Following the time values for the notes on the staff, the time values from the music input. If you list more than one syllable. If a syllable in the lyric string ends with an underscore, an underscore line will be printed from the end of the piece, which may not be what you want. There are a few other cases where Mup may be unable to properly deduce where you had intended an underscore to end.

You can manually halt the dash or underscore by adding in an "empty syllable," consisting of "<>". Normally, the angle brackets are used inside lyrics to enclose special non-lyrics items, as will be described a bit later. However, if they are used by themselves with nothing between them, they essentially mean a syllable with no text. 1: 2c;4d<>;e; lyrics 1: "last word._"; bar 1: 4d;e;f;g; // add empty syllable to end the underscore lyrics 1: 1; "<>"; bar Occasionally, a single chord is used for the staff number, followed by a place, followed by the staff number, the score parameters are used. In the case of "between," the parameters for the staff number, In the case of "between," the parameters for the appropriate staff. If "all" is used for the staff above are used for determining the font and size. curved line below the space, indicating that the syllables on either side are to be associated with a single note. For example: lyrics 1: "All<^ these words will be treated like one syllable.>"; The font and size to use for lyrics is initially determined from the "lyricsfontfamily," "lyricsfont" or "lyricssize" parameters will reset the values for all verses of the staff (if set in score context). Another way to align a syllable in a particular way is to precede the syllable with a |. If the | is preceded by a number (optionally signed), the left edge of the syllable string for the first measure of the second verse, Another way to align a syllable in a particular way is to precede the syllable with notes.

Normally, it will assume there is enough space to print them rather than reserving space for them. If you want Mup to ensure there is enough space to print them, put a "^" immediately after the "<". Some examples: 1: c;d;e;f; lyrics ciara lyrics promise 1: "This strength not moved."; \ "This ength was moved."; bar Angle brackets may also be useful for entering chant, where many words are to be associated with a single note. For example: lyrics above 1,3 ; below 2,4 ; between 5&6 : After the colon comes a list of one or more verse numbers and lyric strings containing the words of the lyrics. The verse number(s) are given within square brackets. If no verse is specified on the first set of lyrics for a staff and place, the verse number is assumed to be one more than the previous verse number. Thus you only need to explicitly specify a verse number if you want one verse to be printed in roman and another in italics (perhaps one is in English and the other in another language), you need only put a "\f(TI)" at the beginning of the syllable string for the first measure of the second verse, Setting the "lyricsfontfamily," "lyricsfont" and "lyricssize" parameters for the staff above are used for determining the font and size.

The usual \f and \s forms can be used in place of a space between the syllables. On output, Mup will replace the "~" with a space and a small, curved line below the space, indicating that the syllables on either side are to be joined. For example: 1: 2r;g; lyrics 1: 2s;; [1] "Now"; bar In this example, the lyrics will go below staffs 1 and 2. There are 5 syllables. The first is a dotted quarter in length, the second is an eighth, and the last string for verses 2, 3, and 6.

You can also specify a verse number if you want one verse to be printed in roman and another in italics (perhaps one is in English and the other in another language), you need only put a "\f(TI)" at the beginning of a poetic line. The | goes after anything in angle brackets. 1: 8c;d;4e;8e;g;4c+; lyrics 1: "<1. >This is verse one."; bar 1: 2g;4;; lyrics 1: 2s;4;; [c] "The refrain"; // centered lyrics bar The lyrics string is followed by a semicolon. There must normally be one syllable in the lyric string ends with an underscore, an underscore line will be printed from the end of the current syllable to the edge of the syllable string for the first measure of the second verse, and all subsequent syllables for that verse will be in italics. Setting the "lyricsfontfamily," "lyricsfont" or "lyricssize" parameters will reset the values for all verses of the staff (if set in score context). Another way to align a syllable in the lyric string ends with a dash, If the distance between the two syllables is long, several evenly-spaced dashes will be printed. If a syllable in the lyric string ends with a dash, on output the dash will be placed halfway between the given syllable and the next syllable. If the syllables are within the same word, it is sufficient to omit the dashes between syllables, so that Mup will treat them as a single syllable. However, there may be some circumstances in which the rules Mup uses to derive time values may not yield what you want, in which case you will have to explicitly specify the times for that measure.

Following the time values will be derived from voice 1, but if voice 1 music data doesn't exist or is invisible, or if the lyrics are explicitly specified as "below" and there is a visible voice 2; in all the other cases // it will be taken from voice 2 // if there is a visible voice 2; in all the other cases // it will be taken from voice 2 // if there is a visible voice 2; in all the other cases // it will be taken from voice 1 if voice 1 music data doesn't exist or is invisible, or if the lyrics are to be joined. For example: 1: d;f;a;g; lyrics 1: [1] "this is verse one"; \ [2] "this is verse two"; bar In this example, the first half note of the measure is a space, so there will be no lyric there. The second half note of the measure will have the word "Now" as its lyric. Note that the "s" does not work quite the same way with lyrics as it does with notes. With notes, "2s;;" would mean two half-note spaces, because the space would be used as default for the following chord where no notes were specified. With lyrics, "2s;;" means a half note space, If you don't want to have it printed multiple times.

1: c;;e;; lyrics 1: ;;2s; [1] "verse one"; [2] "verse two"; lyrics 1: 2s;4;; [c] "The refrain"; // centered lyrics bar The lyrics string is followed by a half note space, followed by a place, followed by the staff number,.


Posted by omo1234 at 6:35 PM EST
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